CalRecycle Proposes Organics Diversion Regulations

In January 2019, CalRecycle issued draft regulations to implement the organic waste diversion requirements of SB 1383 (Lara, 2016).  SB 1383 requires local jurisdictions to divert 50 percent of organic waste away from landfills by 2022 and 75 percent by 2025.  CalRecycle issued draft regulations in 2018, which BAC and others commented on to urge CalRecycle to allow all end uses of bioenergy produced from diverted organic waste and to allow all eligible conversion technologies to meet the diversion requirements.

In January, CalRecycle issued the first formal draft of SB 1383 regulations.  See CalRecycle Proposed SB 1383 regulations (Jan2019)

Governor, Legislature Agree on $1.4 Billion Cap & Trade Investment Plan

The Governor and Legislature have reached agreement on how to spend $1.4 billion in Cap & Trade auction revenues.  The bioenergy related funding allocations in the Cap & Trade Investment Plan are:

  • $175 million for clean vehicle rebate program
  • $180 million for clean trucks, buses and offroad vehicles
  • $112 million for agricultural diesel engine replacement
  • $12.5 million for low carbon fuel production
  • $5 million for Healthy Soils
  • $210 million for healthy forests and forest carbon
  • $99 million for dairy methane reduction
  • $25 million for waste diversion
  • $40 million for transformative climate communities/research

This is the full Cap & Trade Investment Plan 2018-19

CA Legislature Passes Bills to Reauthorize Cap & Trade, Low Carbon Fuel Standard

California’s Legislature has passed a package of bills to extend the state’s Cap & Trade program and Low Carbon Fuel Standard to 2030.  The bills passed with a 2/3 vote, which provides much greater legal certainty for the programs than they have had for the past decade.  Although California extended AB 32 with legislation – SB 32 – that passed in 2016, SB 32 passed with only a majority vote.  That was sufficient to extend regulatory programs to reduce climate pollution and to increase the required reduction to a 40 percent reduction by 2030.  The Governor wanted a 2/3 vote for extension of the Cap & Trade program, however, since it involves an optional fee to purchase allowances and could be subject to legal challenges without a 2/3 vote.

The three bills included in the 2/3 vote are:

1) AB 398 (E. Garcia) – extends Cap & Trade and the LCFS programs to 2030; states that the intent of the Legislature is that cap & Trade revenues will focus on reduction of short-lived climate pollutants and other air pollutants, healthy forests and sustainable agriculture, low and zero carbon fuels, and R&D related to clean energy and climate issues.

2) AB 617 (C. Garcia) – increases monitoring and penalty provisions for air quality protection.

3) ACA 1 – requires that an initiative be placed on the 2018 ballot that asks voters to require a 2/3 vote in 2024 to authorize expenditure of Cap & Trade revenues.

BAC Comments on Updated Short-Lived Climate Pollutant Strategy

State agencies released an updated strategy to reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants in November 2016.  The updated draft is focused on strategies to reduce methane emissions and human-caused black carbon emissions.  Although SB 605 (Lara, 2014) requires a comprehensive strategy to address all major sources of SLCP’s, the current draft omitted any strategy to reduce black carbon from wildfire, which is the single largest source of SLCP’s.  BAC’s Comments on the updated draft urge the state to restore sections on black carbon from wildfire, which had been included in earlier drafts, as required by SB 605.  The Comments also urge the state to allocate a higher share of Cap & Trade revenues to SLCP reduction and to identify important research needs for SLCP reduction.

See BAC Comments on Nov2016 SLCP Strategy.

BAC’s Comments on Short-Lived Climate Pollutant Strategy

The California Air Resources Board released its Proposed Short-Lived Climate Pollutant Reduction Strategy in April 2016.  The Proposed Strategy contains an excellent summary of the science, the urgency and many of the solutions to reduce SLCP’s.  It also contains specific goals and strategies for methane reduction from dairies and the solid waste sector.  While the Proposed Strategy discusses the importance of reducing black carbon from wildfire, it does not set goals for wildfire reduction.

BAC Comments on Proposed Strategy to Reduce SLCP’s

Proposed Strategy to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants

The California Air Resources Board released the Proposed Strategy to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants in April 2016.  The Proposed Strategy underscores the importance reducing SLCP’s as the only way to immediately begin to reverse climate change and its impacts.  It also highlights the need for increased bioenergy production to reduce both methane and black carbon emissions.  It sets specific goals for methane reduction in the dairy and solid waste sectors, and highlights a number of strategies for reducing black carbon emissions from wildfire, which is the single largest source of Short-Lived Climate Pollution.

Read the Proposed Strategy:  Proposed SLCP Reduction Strategy (April 2016)