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CalRecycle Proposes Organics Diversion Regulations

In January 2019, CalRecycle issued draft regulations to implement the organic waste diversion requirements of SB 1383 (Lara, 2016).  SB 1383 requires local jurisdictions to divert 50 percent of organic waste away from landfills by 2022 and 75 percent by 2025.  CalRecycle issued draft regulations in 2018, which BAC and others commented on to urge CalRecycle to allow all end uses of bioenergy produced from diverted organic waste and to allow all eligible conversion technologies to meet the diversion requirements.

In January, CalRecycle issued the first formal draft of SB 1383 regulations.  See CalRecycle Proposed SB 1383 regulations (Jan2019)

California Bioenergy, Land O’Lakes Partner to Advance “Barn to Biogas” in California

CalBio and Land O’Lakes are creating an innovative farmer-led model for “barn to biogas” that can shape nationwide solutions to agricultural methane emissions reduction and unlock new revenue streams for dairy farmers.CalBio provides the expertise needed to develop, execute and manage on-farm methane digesters, as well as market R-CNG credits in California, in a manner that is cost effective for farmers. This partnership with CalBio will also help Land O’Lakes dairy member-owners in California to meet new state standards that call for a 40 percent reduction in dairy and livestock manure-related methane emissions from 2013 levels by 2030.

“CalBio’s dairy digesters are proven in California. We are excited to expand that work even further through this collaboration with Land O’Lakes and their member-owners in California,” said Neil Black, president of CalBio. “Our expertise and ongoing operational support will help dairy farmers make the most of a significant new revenue stream through biogas generation, while allowing them to stay focused on doing what they do best – producing wholesome, delicious food in a sustainable way.”

Learn more about the CalBio partnership.

BAC Comments on Updated Short-Lived Climate Pollutant Strategy

State agencies released an updated strategy to reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants in November 2016.  The updated draft is focused on strategies to reduce methane emissions and human-caused black carbon emissions.  Although SB 605 (Lara, 2014) requires a comprehensive strategy to address all major sources of SLCP’s, the current draft omitted any strategy to reduce black carbon from wildfire, which is the single largest source of SLCP’s.  BAC’s Comments on the updated draft urge the state to restore sections on black carbon from wildfire, which had been included in earlier drafts, as required by SB 605.  The Comments also urge the state to allocate a higher share of Cap & Trade revenues to SLCP reduction and to identify important research needs for SLCP reduction.

See BAC Comments on Nov2016 SLCP Strategy.

BAC / TSS Consultants’ Article in “Biomass Monitor”

See the Opinion Piece in Biomass Monitor on “Forest Biomass Utilization Combatting Catastrophic Wildfires,” written by Julia Levin of BAC and Tad Mason of TSS Consultants.  The piece explains that catastrophic wildfires are not natural or good for California forests, emit huge quantities of black carbon and other pollutants and threaten California water supplies.  Forest fuel treatment and use of that biomass to produce energy can help restore healthy, more resilient forests and cut pollution from wildfires and fossil fuel power generation.

 

Proposed Strategy to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants

The California Air Resources Board released the Proposed Strategy to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants in April 2016.  The Proposed Strategy underscores the importance reducing SLCP’s as the only way to immediately begin to reverse climate change and its impacts.  It also highlights the need for increased bioenergy production to reduce both methane and black carbon emissions.  It sets specific goals for methane reduction in the dairy and solid waste sectors, and highlights a number of strategies for reducing black carbon emissions from wildfire, which is the single largest source of Short-Lived Climate Pollution.

Read the Proposed Strategy:  Proposed SLCP Reduction Strategy (April 2016)