BAC Comments on CalRecycle SB 1383 Regulations

BAC submitted comments on CalRecycle’s October 2019 draft of regulations to implement the  organic waste diversion requirements of SB 1383.  CalRecycle expanded the list of eligible alternatives to landfilling to include electricity, heating, and vehicle production from diverted organic waste.  The draft regulations also include electricity generation from biomass conversion, but the October draft deleted pipeline biogas, which could exclude the use of biogas for cooking, commercial and industrial purposes.

See BAC Comments on Proposed Changes to Organics Regs (Oct 18, 2019)

CalRecycle Released Nearly Final SB 1383 Regulations

SB 1383 (Lara, 2016) requires local jurisdictions to divert 50 percent of organics going to landfills by 2020 and 75 percent by 2025.   In October, CalRecycle released the nearly final regulations to implement these requirements.  The regulations focus on procurement of bioenergy or compost as the compliance mechanism and establish specific procurement amounts.  For bioenergy, the draft regulations allow conversion of diverted organic waste to electricity, heating, and vehicle fuel.  The draft regulations also allow biomass conversion to electricity.

See, SLCPFormalProposedRegulationTextOct2019

BAC Comments on CPUC Microgrid Proceeding

BAC submitted comments in late October on the CPUC’s Order Instituting Rulemaking.  BAC urged the Commission to address the need for baseload and flexible generation, to consider opportunities to convert local organic waste to local energy supplies, to include renewable gas for microgrid reliability, to consider the importance of Short-Lived Climate Pollutant reductions, and to consider other upstream benefits like wildfire mitigation and landfill reduction.  BAC’s comments are on BAC’s website.

The CPUC is expected to issue the Scoping Ruling in early 2020 and to complete the development of the microgrid framework by the end of 2020.

See R.19-09-009 BAC Comments on OIR

CPUC Opens New Proceeding on Microgrids

In September, the CPUC launched a new proceeding to develop a policy framework for microgrids.  Microgrids are defined areas of the grid that can operate as part of the larger grid and can also be completely disconnected from (operate independently from) the larger electricity grid.  Microgrids include the energy producers, transmission and distribution lines, and energy end users that are within a defined electricity boundary.  The goal of establishing microgrids is to enable communities to have a fully independent grid that can operate even when there are disturbances to the regional grid.  The recent Public Safety Power Shutoffs have underscored the urgency of developing microgrids, especially for essential services like firefighters and police, hospitals, wastewater treatment, communications, and more.

The CPUC launched the new proceeding to develop the framework for commercializing microgrids.  It will consider the appropriate standards, eligible technologies, rates, tariffs and other issues for microgrid development in California.

See the CPUC’s Order Instituting this new Rulemaking:  OIR on Microgrids Rulemaking (R.19-09-009)

CEC Adopts Clean Transportation Funding Program

The California Energy Commission has adopted a new Clean Transportation Funding Plan (formerly known as the ARFVTP or AB 118 program) for 2019-2020.  The overall funding remains at $100 million annually, but the CEC cut biofuels funding from $20 million to $10 million.  The biofuels funding is now limited to low carbon, waste-based fuels and renewable hydrogen.

To read the full plan, see CEC’s 2019-20 Clean Transportation Funding Plan.

Legislative Analyst Critiques State’s Transportation Climate Programs

In December 2018, the non-partisan Legislative Analyst’s Office released reports on the state’s climate change mitigation programs.  The reports noted a lack of coordination across programs, significant duplication, and a number of programs that are not cost-effective or effective at all.  The LAO singled out the state’s transportation programs in a stand-alone report that shows that most of the state’s programs are failing to show measurable progress, particularly the state’s investments in zero-emission vehicles.  The LAO report found that the only transportation sector that has made progress in reducing climate emissions is the heavy duty sector and that those are also the most cost-effective investments in climate and air pollution reductions.

Read the full report here: LAO climate-policies-transportation-122118

CalRecycle Proposes Organics Diversion Regulations

In January 2019, CalRecycle issued draft regulations to implement the organic waste diversion requirements of SB 1383 (Lara, 2016).  SB 1383 requires local jurisdictions to divert 50 percent of organic waste away from landfills by 2022 and 75 percent by 2025.  CalRecycle issued draft regulations in 2018, which BAC and others commented on to urge CalRecycle to allow all end uses of bioenergy produced from diverted organic waste and to allow all eligible conversion technologies to meet the diversion requirements.

In January, CalRecycle issued the first formal draft of SB 1383 regulations.  See CalRecycle Proposed SB 1383 regulations (Jan2019)

BAC-CASA Comments on CPUC’s Proposed Pipeline Biogas Decision

BAC and CASA filed joint comments fully supporting the CPUC’s Proposed Decision on changes to pipeline biogas standards and urged the Commission to begin a new phase to consider additional incentives for pipeline biogas and a biogas procurement program that includes all sources and conversion technologies.

See R.13-02-008 Joint BAC-CASA Comments on Proposed Decision