BAC Comments on CalRecycle SB 1383 Regulations

BAC submitted comments on CalRecycle’s October 2019 draft of regulations to implement the  organic waste diversion requirements of SB 1383.  CalRecycle expanded the list of eligible alternatives to landfilling to include electricity, heating, and vehicle production from diverted organic waste.  The draft regulations also include electricity generation from biomass conversion, but the October draft deleted pipeline biogas, which could exclude the use of biogas for cooking, commercial and industrial purposes.

See BAC Comments on Proposed Changes to Organics Regs (Oct 18, 2019)

CalRecycle Released Nearly Final SB 1383 Regulations

SB 1383 (Lara, 2016) requires local jurisdictions to divert 50 percent of organics going to landfills by 2020 and 75 percent by 2025.   In October, CalRecycle released the nearly final regulations to implement these requirements.  The regulations focus on procurement of bioenergy or compost as the compliance mechanism and establish specific procurement amounts.  For bioenergy, the draft regulations allow conversion of diverted organic waste to electricity, heating, and vehicle fuel.  The draft regulations also allow biomass conversion to electricity.

See, SLCPFormalProposedRegulationTextOct2019

CalRecycle Proposes Organics Diversion Regulations

In January 2019, CalRecycle issued draft regulations to implement the organic waste diversion requirements of SB 1383 (Lara, 2016).  SB 1383 requires local jurisdictions to divert 50 percent of organic waste away from landfills by 2022 and 75 percent by 2025.  CalRecycle issued draft regulations in 2018, which BAC and others commented on to urge CalRecycle to allow all end uses of bioenergy produced from diverted organic waste and to allow all eligible conversion technologies to meet the diversion requirements.

In January, CalRecycle issued the first formal draft of SB 1383 regulations.  See CalRecycle Proposed SB 1383 regulations (Jan2019)

BAC Comments on Updated Short-Lived Climate Pollutant Strategy

State agencies released an updated strategy to reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants in November 2016.  The updated draft is focused on strategies to reduce methane emissions and human-caused black carbon emissions.  Although SB 605 (Lara, 2014) requires a comprehensive strategy to address all major sources of SLCP’s, the current draft omitted any strategy to reduce black carbon from wildfire, which is the single largest source of SLCP’s.  BAC’s Comments on the updated draft urge the state to restore sections on black carbon from wildfire, which had been included in earlier drafts, as required by SB 605.  The Comments also urge the state to allocate a higher share of Cap & Trade revenues to SLCP reduction and to identify important research needs for SLCP reduction.

See BAC Comments on Nov2016 SLCP Strategy.

BAC’s Comments on Short-Lived Climate Pollutant Strategy

The California Air Resources Board released its Proposed Short-Lived Climate Pollutant Reduction Strategy in April 2016.  The Proposed Strategy contains an excellent summary of the science, the urgency and many of the solutions to reduce SLCP’s.  It also contains specific goals and strategies for methane reduction from dairies and the solid waste sector.  While the Proposed Strategy discusses the importance of reducing black carbon from wildfire, it does not set goals for wildfire reduction.

BAC Comments on Proposed Strategy to Reduce SLCP’s

Proposed Strategy to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants

The California Air Resources Board released the Proposed Strategy to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants in April 2016.  The Proposed Strategy underscores the importance reducing SLCP’s as the only way to immediately begin to reverse climate change and its impacts.  It also highlights the need for increased bioenergy production to reduce both methane and black carbon emissions.  It sets specific goals for methane reduction in the dairy and solid waste sectors, and highlights a number of strategies for reducing black carbon emissions from wildfire, which is the single largest source of Short-Lived Climate Pollution.

Read the Proposed Strategy:  Proposed SLCP Reduction Strategy (April 2016)