BAC Comments on Proposed Changes to the LCFS

BAC submitted comments to the Air Resources Board on proposed changes to the Low Carbon Fuel Standard Program, including:

  • Support for increasing the carbon intensity requirement for 2030 and establishing 5-year interim targets between 2025 and 2045.
  • Need to prioritize fuels that reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants to meet the requirements of SB 1383.
  • Adopt incentives to support instate biofuels generated from organic waste.
  • Support adoption of sustainability criteria for biofuels.
  • Need to add “book and claim” for hydrogen and electricity generated from biogas, consistent with the RPS.
  • Need to accurately account for avoided landfill emissions.

Read BAC’s comments on proposed changes to the LCFS:

California Air Board Proposes Changes to Low Carbon Fuel Standard

The Low Carbon Fuels Standard Program has helped to reduce the carbon intensity of on-road vehicle fuels by nearly 10 percent over the last decade, largely thanks to increased biofuels production. Unfortunately, LCFS credit prices have dropped more than 50 percent, which threatens to slow California’s progress in reducing transportation climate emissions. To address the issue and better align the LCFS program with California’s climate goals, program staff presented several potential changes to the program, including increasing the required carbon reductions by 2030, including Sustainable Aviation Fuels, adopting sustainability criteria for biofuels, and more.

See the LCFS program staff presentation here.

CEC Adopts Clean Transportation Funding Program

The California Energy Commission has adopted a new Clean Transportation Funding Plan (formerly known as the ARFVTP or AB 118 program) for 2019-2020.  The overall funding remains at $100 million annually, but the CEC cut biofuels funding from $20 million to $10 million.  The biofuels funding is now limited to low carbon, waste-based fuels and renewable hydrogen.

To read the full plan, see CEC’s 2019-20 Clean Transportation Funding Plan.

Legislative Analyst Critiques State’s Transportation Climate Programs

In December 2018, the non-partisan Legislative Analyst’s Office released reports on the state’s climate change mitigation programs.  The reports noted a lack of coordination across programs, significant duplication, and a number of programs that are not cost-effective or effective at all.  The LAO singled out the state’s transportation programs in a stand-alone report that shows that most of the state’s programs are failing to show measurable progress, particularly the state’s investments in zero-emission vehicles.  The LAO report found that the only transportation sector that has made progress in reducing climate emissions is the heavy duty sector and that those are also the most cost-effective investments in climate and air pollution reductions.

Read the full report here: LAO climate-policies-transportation-122118